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The 10 sweetest destinations in Mexico

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Mexico stands out not only for its beaches and cities, but also for its various sweet treats, from chocolate to vanilla to caramels. Even sweet potatoes are whipped into sugary confections.

Savor Mexico’s sweetest destinations, not necessarily in this order:

The brood cells of the Stingless Mayan Bees in Yucatán are constantly filled with new eggs. Photo: Getty
The brood cells of the Stingless Mayan Bees of Yucatán are constantly filled with new eggs. Photo: Getty

Yucatán

Rich Melipona-bee honey, besides being very tasty, has many healthy properties and has medical uses going back to pre-historic times. But mainly, we enjoy adding it to tea, spooning it over bread, or eating it out of the jar. The fact that Melipona bees don’t sting make the honey seem even more sweet.


Tabasco is the leading cacao producer in Mexico. Photo: Getty
Tabasco is the leading cacao producer in Mexico. Photo: Getty

Tabasco

The state is known for its many haciendas cocoateras, and has stood out as the leading producer of chocolate for Mexicans. In Tabasco, there is nothing like walking the traditional Cacao trail.


Vanilla ice cream owes its essence to producers in Veracruz. Photo: Getty
Vanilla ice cream owes its essence to producers in Veracruz. Photo: Getty

Papantla

This magical town of Veracruz is not known only for its famous flying acrobats, but also for the delicious vanilla produced here. Papantla vanilla is ranked among the ten best in the world. Side note: The vanilla orchid blooms just one morning per year and only the Melipona Bee knows how to pollinate the vanilla flower.


The Feria del Alfeñique in Toluca. Photo: /vmexicoalmaximo.com
The Feria del Alfeñique in Toluca. Photo: vmexicoalmaximo.com

Toluca

The capital of the state of Mexico is renown for its popular alfeñiques, sweet little confections that are shaped as animals, skulls, people or other foods. They are made of sugar glass, a brittle transparent form of sweetener that looks like glass. The Feria del Alfeñique celebrates the Día de Muertos in the middle of October to the beginning of November.


Costanzo chocolate started in San Luis Potosi. Photo: Pinterest
Costanzo chocolate started in San Luis Potosi. Photo: Pinterest

San Luis Potosi

While it is not in a particularly popular region for candies, the famous Costanzo chocolate was founded by Italian immigrants in San Luis Potosi. Today the company has more than 100 employees, using Italian and German technology to produce more than 150 sweet products.


The Museo del Dulce en Calle Real in Morelia. Photo: detrip.mx
The Museo del Dulce on Calle Real in Morelia. Photo: detrip.mx

Morelia

The capital of Michoacan is known for its varied sweets, which are perfect gifts for family and friends. It is almost mandatory to visit the Museo del Dulce on Calle Real when you’re in the city. This is a small, charming museum, with staff in period costume, behind a sweet shop.


In 1998, a group of women from Santa Rosa, Guanajuato, established a company dedicated to making jam and preserves derived from local fruits and vegetables. Photo: consultarse.org
In 1998, a group of women from Santa Rosa, Guanajuato, established a company dedicated to making jam and preserves derived from local fruits and vegetables. Photo: consultarse.org

Santa Rosa de Lima

In this pueblo magico in the state of Guanajuato, making jams is very common. Here you can find the Conservas Santa Rosa, a small business started and run by a group of women who produce traditional preserves. If you can’t make it to Santa Rosa de Lima, watch for Conservas Santa Rosa when visiting fairs across the country.


Glorias, the pride of Nuevo Leon.
Glorias, the pride of Linares, Nuevo Leon. Photo: Flickriver.com

Linares

In this Nuevo Leon city, Glorias are sweets made based on goat’s milk, corn syrup, vanilla and chopped nuts. Although you find this in many markets throughout Mexico, Nuevoleonenses in particular treasure this sweet.


La cajeta de Celaya is made from sweet milk. Photo: directoalpaladar.com.mx
La cajeta de Celaya is made from sweet milk. Photo: directoalpaladar.com.mx

Celaya

Here in Guanajuato, the local caramels were declared “Dessert of the Bicentennial” in 2010. The condiment is made from goat’s milk, brown sugar and vanilla or cinnamon.


Calle de Santa Clara in Puebla is better known as "Sweet Street." Photo: Globalfile.com
Calle de Santa Clara in Puebla is better known as “Sweet Street.” Photo: Globalfile.com

Puebla

Puebla’s Calle de Santa Clara is better known as Sweets Street. A major destination for candy lovers. For three blocks, both sides of the street are lined with stores selling sweets with a distinctly Mexican flair: sacred hearts, guitars, and sombreros. Don’t forget to pick up some Camotes Poblanos, a sweet-potato-and-sugar mixture traced to a local convent.

El Camote Poblano, a sweet-potato based candy found in Puebla. Photo: Yo Soy Puebla
El Camote Poblano, a sweet-potato based candy found in Puebla. Photo: Yo Soy Puebla

Sources: Coyotitos.com, Afar, Wikipedia

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