Freediver Lemus beats own world record in cenote Ucil

Freediving or skin-diving is a form of underwater diving that relies entirely on breath-holding until resurfacing, foregoing scuba gear

Despite the dangers, Yucatán’s cenotes continue to attract a growing number of freedivers. Photo: Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Despite the dangers, Yucatán’s cenotes continue to attract a growing number of freedivers. Photo: Carlos Rosado van der Gracht

For the second day in a row, Alejandro Lemus set a new fresh-water freediving world record, descending 94 meters into cenote Ucil.

Lemus broke his own record, set the day before, by 12 meters.

Lemus announced that he will now attempt a new free diving record, this time without the use of flippers.

Freediving is considered an extreme sport, given tremendous pressure on the lungs as divers descend. It is not uncommon for freedivers to lose consciousness as they approach the surface of the water. This dangerous phenomenon is known as “shallow-water blackout.”

Despite the risk, the sport has been gaining popularity in the Yucatán peninsula as local and international divers flock to the region’s cenotes to attempt their own personal records. To address this growing demand, freediving schools have begun popping up in Mérida, Tulum, and Playa del Carmen.

Carlos Rosado van der Gracht

Born in Mérida, Carlos Rosado van der Gracht is a Mexican/Canadian blogger, photographer and adventure expedition leader. He holds degrees in multimedia, philosophy and translation from universities in Mexico, Canada and Norway.