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‘Incredible’ find: A cave filled with relics beneath Chichen Itza

INAH researchers perform 6-hour purification ritual before entering cavern

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In what the lead archaeologist calls an “incredible” find, researchers have announced the existence of a cave filled with hundreds of artifacts beneath the Chichen Itza ruins.

The massive cave is a “scientific treasure,” said archaeologist Guillermo de Anda, speaking at a news conference.

He said it could help scientists better understand the origins, lives and beliefs of the residents of Chichen Itza, a stunning city of stone in the Yucatan peninsula that was founded sometime around 750 AD.

The cave was found about two kilometers / 1.2 miles from the Temple of Kukulcan, the giant stepped pyramid that dominates the archeological site.

About 24 meters / 80 feet underground, the cave contains multiple chambers connected by narrow passages —often so narrow that archaeologists had to crawl or drag themselves through them, De Anda said.

His team has explored about 460 meters of the cave so far, and researchers don’t know how much farther it stretches.

The relics found include seven incense burners shaped like the Mayan rain god Chaac.

De Anda said locals had actually discovered the cave more than 50 years ago.

But the archaeologist sent to explore the site at the time decided for unknown reasons to seal the entrance with stones, and filed only a brief report to their bosses at INAH, the national agency in charge or guarding Mexico’s heritage.

De Anda had seen the report, but did not give it much thought — until he happened upon the entrance to the cave last year while exploring another site nearby.

“What we found there was incredible, and completely untouched,” he said.

The residents of Chichen Itza probably considered the cave “the bowels of the gods,” he added.

His team believes the largest incense burners, meant to prompt rain, date from around 700 to 1000 AD.

The indigenous Mayas who inhabit the area today warned his team that a venomous coral snake guarded the site. And they were right.

Researchers did in fact find just such a specimen, which blocked their access to the cave for four days, De Anda said.

At locals’ behest, they performed a six-hour purification ritual before entering the cave.

De Anda’s team plans to continue exploring the cave. Rather than remove the artifacts they find, they will study them on site, he said.

Source: Agencies

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