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Sunday, November 27, 2022

Marines to take over security at Mérida and Cancún airports

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Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Born in Mérida, Carlos Rosado van der Gracht is a Mexican/Canadian blogger, photographer and adventure expedition leader. He holds degrees in multimedia, philosophy and translation from universities in Mexico, Canada and Norway. Sign up for the Yucatán Roundup, a free newsletter, which delivers the week's top headlines every Monday.
No concrete reason was given to explain the decision to pull the national guard out of seven airports across Mexico. Photo: Carlos Rosado van der Gracht 

Mexico’s Marines will be taking control of seven airports across the country, with  Mérida and Cancún among them. 

On the Yucatán Peninsula, the change is scheduled to take place as early as this month when security responsibilities will be taken by the Marines from Mexico’s National Guard.

The transition has already taken place in Mexico City’s Benito Juarez Airport, in Terminals 1 and 2. 

Other affected airports include those in Cozumel, Tapachula, Kahua (Chichén Itzá) and Tuxla Gutiérrez.

It has also been announced that members of the armed forces will be taking control of customs security in Progreso’s port. 

“We are taking these measures to safeguard security while at the same time fighting off privatization and freeing up resources for important infrastructure projects,” said President Andrés Manuel López Obrador.

Earlier: AMLO hands Tren Maya to army, touts its economic benefits

Since assuming the presidency, López Obrador has relied heavily on Mexico’s armed forces for several key infrastructure projects and to offer security. 

This is despite his criticism of past administrations for “militarizing” the country.

Like in the United States, Mexico’s president also serves as the country’s commander in chief, giving him full discretion over the armed forces. 

Critics noted that the relationship AMLO has forged with the armed forces is too close for comfort and raises significant constitutional concerns. 

Though Mexico’s armed forces are not without scandal or controversy, they remain one of the institutions most trusted by Mexicans, according to a recent poll by El Financiero. 

The institutions with the lowest levels of trust in the country include political parties, followed by the state police, justice ministers, and municipal officials.

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