New LGBTQ+ community market makes a splash in Mérida’s parks

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Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Born in Mérida, Carlos Rosado van der Gracht is a Mexican/Canadian blogger, photographer and adventure expedition leader. He holds degrees in multimedia, philosophy and translation from universities in Mexico, Canada and Norway. Sign up for the Yucatán Roundup, a free newsletter, which delivers the week's top headlines every Monday.
“Bazaritas” outdoor market organizers say they hope to continue growing in order to offer a safe space for the LGBTQ+ community and its allies. Photo: Courtesy

Members of LGBTQ+ community are carving out spaces in local parks to host their own outdoor markets.

The first of these outdoor markets was held in May to coincide with the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia.

Organizers are now promoting their outdoor markets, dubbed “Bazaritas,” as a safe space for LGBTQ+ people to sell their products. 

“Besides being an opportunity for LGBTQ+ to sell a variety of products, these markets seek to normalize the visibility of our community in public spaces and fight prejudice,” said Muñeca Aguilar Martínez of Comando Trans Interseccional.

Vendors report that they have been doing fairly well and that for the most part people have been very receptive and respectful, but that once in a while they do get hateful comments. 

The next “Bazarita” is scheduled to take place Sunday, Nov. 21 in Mejorada Park.

Earlier: Lawmaker seeks to end gay conversion therapy in Yucatán

Aside from selling products such as crafts, clothing, and accessories, the outdoor markets also feature entertainment in the form of performances and catwalks. 

This has been a milestone year for Yucatán’s LGBTQ+ community. On Oct. 25, the state passed a bill making same-sex marrige legal. 

The vote passed with 20 votes in favor and five against. Attempts to pass a measure to allow gay and lesbian couples to marry previously failed twice, most recently in 2019.

However, despite this victory, LGBTQ+ activists say that there is still much work to be done, especially when it comes to issues surrounding trans rights.

In an interview, Yucatrans’ Trillo Herrera, said that although some improvements have been made, Yucatán remains an extremely transphobic region, an observation shared by Mexico’s human rights commission.

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