###

Pro-marijuana bicyclists parade down the Paseo de Montejo

Don't miss

Progreso’s enormous pier turns 80 years old

Progreso’s maritime pier, the longest in the world, turned 80 last weekend.

Comalcalco, the oddball of the Maya world

Archaeology Monday provides historical background, photos and practical information about these ancient marvels and how to get out and enjoy them for yourself. This week we travel far afield to western Tabasco to explore the unique ancient city of Comalcalco.

Yucatán No. 1 in COVID deaths among indigenous people

Although four other states have larger indigenous populations, Yucatán ranks first in Mexico for infections and deaths...
Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Born in Mérida, Carlos Rosado van der Gracht is a Mexican/Canadian blogger, photographer and adventure expedition leader. He holds degrees in multimedia, philosophy and translation from universities in Mexico, Canada and Norway. Sign up for the Yucatán Roundup, a free newsletter, which delivers the week's top headlines every Monday.
Dozens of activists met on the Paseo de Montejo at 4:20 pm Tuesday to take part in a pro-marijuana bicycle caravan. Photo: Courtesy

Pro-marijuana activists on bicycles paraded down Paseo de Montejo demanding an end to prohibition. 

The event was held on Tuesday, April 20 — or 4/20, cannabis culture slang for smoking pot. The date has become an international counterculture holiday.

The cycling caravan started off at the Remate and finished at the Parque de la Paz, across from the Centenario Zoo.

Rally organizers said that the event was held in part to protests Mexican lawmakers who have willfully failed to follow instructions laid down by the Supreme Court regarding marijuana legalization

At the end of the event, several participants decided to light up joints so that “the authorities could smell what was going on.” Photo: Courtesy

The legal status of marijuana is in a gray area. The drug is still listed as a narcotic but the Mexican Supreme Court has ruled its prohibition unconstitutional.

A bill seeking to regulate the legal possession and distribution of marijuana was approved last March in Mexico’s lower legislative assembly. However, because multiple amendments were made to the bill, the proposed law requires ratification, yet again.

Earlier: Lawmakers not happy with marijuana market next to the Mexican Senate

Pro-marijuana activists claim that the new amendments are intended to favor big business and tighten restrictions on home growing. The new rules would also require anyone cultivating marijuana, even for personal use, to register with the government and solicit a special license.

However, some activists believe that these and other provisions are ultimately just a strategy to run out the clock on the April 31 deadline imposed by the Supreme Court. 

“This legislation is very important and we need to get it right. For this reason, we will be petitioning the Supreme Court for an extension on the time frame for legislation,” said Senate President Ricardo Monreal.

Industry analysts expect the debate surrounding marijuana legalization to resume next September.

With a population of over 127 million, Mexico would become the largest cannabis market in the world. 

However, contrary to popular perception, marijuana consumption in Mexico has historically been quite modest among the general population.

- Advertisement -


- Advertisement -

Popular

Its port quiet for over a year, Progreso will welcome Carnival Breeze in July

Progreso will be a rare port of call for Carnival in July.

Stranded 3 years in Yucatán, Alejandra Juarez will be home for Mother’s Day

Alejandra Juarez and her husband of 20 years Temo Juarez, an Iraq combat veteran, enjoy a barbecue with friends in April....

Are COVID-19 restrictions in Yucatan about to come to an end?

Several COVID-19 restrictions expected to be lifted next Monday in Yucatán.

Paraíso: One of Yucatán’s best-kept archaeological secrets

Because of its remote location, most in Yucatán have never even heard of Paraíso — let alone visited.
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -