73.9 F
Mérida
Wednesday, August 4, 2021
###

Tourist held after she illegally climbs Chichén Itzá pyramid

Recent headlines

Yucatán coronavirus cases exceed 55,000 as daily infections rise

After four consecutive weeks of declines, coronavirus infections rose in Yucatán during the last seven days.

Parque de la Madre: Small Centro park turned feminist icon

The Parque Morelos, now mainly known as Parque de la Madre - mother’s park, shelters a replica of Charles Lenoir’s sculpture “Maternite.” 

New permit allows restaurants in Yucatán to stay open longer

Yucatán's state government has announced that restaurants will now be allowed to remain for one hour longer, until 11 pm.
Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Born in Mérida, Carlos Rosado van der Gracht is a Mexican/Canadian blogger, photographer and adventure expedition leader. He holds degrees in multimedia, philosophy and translation from universities in Mexico, Canada and Norway. Sign up for the Yucatán Roundup, a free newsletter, which delivers the week's top headlines every Monday.
Kukulkán Pyramid, before regulations prohibited tourists from climbing the famous structure. Photo: Carlos Rosado van der Gracht

A tourist from Tijuana raised the ire of security personnel in Chichén Itzá when she ascended the famous Pyramid of Kukulkán.

According to security at the archaeological site, the woman showed signs of intoxication. Amongst boos and jeers from other tourists, the woman descended the pyramid and was quickly detained by security. She was then taken to Pisté where she faced local authorities.

The woman explained that she had climbed the pyramid as part of a promise to her deceased husband, whose ashes she claimed to be carrying. According to unverified sources on social media, the woman managed to sprinkle his remains atop the pyramid.

This is not the first time that a tourist has illegally climbed the pyramid. During the spring equinox in 2018, a visitor to the site quickly made his way up the structure to “take a selfie” and “absorb energy.”

The pyramid of Kukulkán — also known as “El Castillo” — is the most famous Maya monument in Yucatán, and arguably in the entire Maya world. In 2008, Mexico’s Institute for History and Anthropology (INAH) prohibited all tourists from climbing the structure citing concerns regarding its preservation.

On social media, she earned the hashtag #ladykukulkan.

More news

Bonampak: Mérida’s newest hot spot is a feast for the eyes

Mérida’s most Instagram-worthy bar has opened its doors after filling its walls with color.

The MACAY, Yucatán’s only museum of its kind, says goodbye

The MACAY has been housed in Mérida’s Ateneo Peninsular complex since 1994. Photo: Courtesy Yucatán’s contemporary art museum,...

A plea to end Mérida’s days of unchecked growth

A new report titled "the costs of urban expansion in Mexico" has found that Mérida's strategy for growth is alarmingly deficient.

Looking to buy ceramics? Look no further than Ticul

When entering the town on the road from the nearby town of Muna, you will notice a string of several shops ceiling ceramic crafts, plates, ornaments, and pots.