Activists: Yucatán continues to lag behind on transgender rights

Transgender flags waved at International Transgender Day of Visibility rally in Mexico City. Photo: Courtesy
Flags representing the community wave at the International Transgender Day of Visibility rally in Mexico City. Photo: Courtesy

Yucatán has fallen behind when it comes to legislation affecting transgender individuals, say activists on the International Transgender Day of Visibility, which is today.

In Mexico, 12 states allow trans people to easily modify their gender on official documents such as birth certificates. Yucatán is not among them. 

People over 18 are legally allowed to change their names in Yucatán, but it is only possible to reassign gender on official documents through the use of a complicated legal recourse known as an amparo. 

The situation for people in Yucatán who want to legally change their gender is much like that of same-sex couples who want to marry. It is legally possible but requires a good deal of expensive and time-consuming legal maneuvering. 

Earlier: Yucatrans: Fighting for the rights of the transgender community

“Having documentation which reflects individuals identity is a human right. Furthermore, it is necessary to have proper documents in order to apply for work, government programs and things such as driver’s licenses,” said psychologist and trans advocate Amelia Ojeda Sosa.

Since 2018, Unasse, a nongovernmental organization based in Mérida, has helped 15 transgender individuals to legally change their gender through the use of amparos. In the past, the legal process has taken an average of four months to complete.  

The International Transgender Day of Visibility is observed every March 31 and is dedicated to celebrating transgender people and raising awareness of discrimination faced by trans people worldwide, as well as a celebration of their contributions to society.

Carlos Rosado van der Gracht

Born in Mérida, Carlos Rosado van der Gracht is a Mexican/Canadian blogger, photographer and adventure expedition leader. He holds degrees in multimedia, philosophy and translation from universities in Mexico, Canada and Norway.