Boardwalk to bring tourists to El Cuyo

El Cuyo is situated where the Caribbean sea meets the Gulf of Mexico. Photo: Flickr
El Cuyo is situated where the Caribbean sea meets the Gulf of Mexico. Photo: Flickr
El Cuyo is situated where the Caribbean sea meets the Gulf of Mexico. Photo: Flickr

A boardwalk and pier will be built in the port of El Cuyo, Tizimin, as part of a government project to promote tourism at the Biosphere Reserve of Ria Lagartos.

The work will cost 18 million pesos and will be financed equally by the state and federal government.

The project stems from several meetings with federal and state tourism officials. Environmental permits are pending.

The boardwalk will include a pier, a paved road, a concrete walkway, an area for fishing, another for biking and a parking lot.

Officials hope El Cuyo will benefit from its proximity to Holbox, already a popular tourist destination.

A new boardwalk will be built in the port of El Cuyo, Tizimin, as part of a government project to promote development in tourism. Google map
A new boardwalk will be built in the port of El Cuyo, Tizimin, as part of a government project to promote tourism. Google map

The Federal Ministry of Tourism and the state government is also splitting a 12-million-peso tab on new exterior lighting for various colonial churches and the Calzada de Los Frailes, a historic street, in Valladolid.

 

El Cuyo is “the hidden treasure of the Yucatecan emerald coast,” writes Yucatan Today, noting that this spot on the coast is where the turquoise blue Caribbean Sea mingles with the shallow waters of the Gulf of Mexico. “El Cuyo is a small beach community where you will enjoy the tranquil ambiance of a port. Everything about it invites you to relax and enjoy the beauty of the nature.”

Home to 1,500 residents, many of whom still make a living on fishing boats, this village is nestled in the National Park of Ria Lagartos, famous for its pink flamingos and sea turtles.

 

 

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