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China unveils ice replica of Chichén Itzá’s famous Kukuklcán Pyramid

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Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Born in Mérida, Carlos Rosado van der Gracht is a Mexican/Canadian blogger, photographer and adventure expedition leader. He holds degrees in multimedia, philosophy and translation from universities in Mexico, Canada and Norway. Sign up for the Yucatán Roundup, a free newsletter, which delivers the week's top headlines every Monday.
Artists in China have created a replica of the Pyramid of Kukulcán made entirely out of ice.
The replica of Yucatán’s most famous monument was presented at the Harbin International Snow and Ice Festival, which has been held since 1985. Photo: Courtesy of China’s Embassy in Mexico

The replica of Yucatán’s most famous monument was presented at the Harbin International Snow and Ice Festival, which has been held since 1985. Photo: Courtesy of China’s Embassy in Mexico.  Photo: Courtesy of China’s Embassy in Mexico

Artists in China have created a replica of the Pyramid of Kukulcán made entirely out of ice. 

The Embassy of China in Mexico reported that the ice replica is a tribute to Mexico celebrating the 50th anniversary of diplomatic relations between the two nations. 

The ice sculpture was presented during the Harbin International Snow and Ice Sculpture Festival, celebrated in China’s northeast.

“The sculpture of our beloved pyramid is extremely fitting to celebrate this momentous occasion,” said Yucatán Gov. Mauricio Vila Dosal.

Tweet by China’s Embassy in Mexico City. 

The festival is the largest of its kind in the world and draws millions of visitors every year. 

Earlier: A new way of looking at Yucatán’s famed Chichén Itzá

Before the breakout of the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2019 edition saw 120,000 cubic meters of ice and 111,000 cubic meters of snow.

The icy artworks are created yearly by thousands of artists in temperatures as low as -35C / -31F using swing saws, chisels, and ice picks.

The Pyramid of Kukulcán, also known as El Castillo, is a Mesoamerican step-pyramid standing 30 meters tall. As its name suggests, the pyramid was dedicated to the cult of the feathered serpent deity known as Kukulcán — who was closely related to Quetzalcoatl, a similar divine figure worshiped in central Mexico by peoples including the Aztec.

By the time Chichén Itzá reached the height of its power in the 11th or 12th century, it was one of the most diverse cities in all of Mesoamerica. The ancient metropolis attracted migrants and merchants from across the region — a fact that is reflected in the city’s diverse architecture.

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