Yucatán Expands Liquor Sales in Time for the Holidays

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Just as in the US, Canada, and Europe, alcohol sales spike dramatically over the Christmas holidays in Mexico. Photo: Carlos Rosado van der Gracht / Yucatán Magazine

Yucatán’s state government has announced longer liquor sales hours just in time for the holidays. 

The extension comes into effect on Sunday, Dec. 3. 

The new regulations mean that until Dec. 31, the Sunday 5 p.m. cutoff time at convenience stores and liquor shops will be extended to 10 p.m. — in line with other day of the week. 

This is meant to combat the illegal after-hours sale at inflated prices at underground shops known as clandestinos

The serving times in restaurants and bars, however, will remain unchanged, though these regulations tend to be much more lax. 

State and municipal police forces have also announced that they will increase the number of sobriety checkpoints inside cities and along highways to combat drunk driving. 

Checkpoints will be in place through Jan. 7. Expect police to be positioned along busy roads, including the Periférico and its on- and off-ramps. Photo: Carlos Rosado van der Gracht / Yucatán Magazine

Earlier: Christmas in Yucatán: What We Love Most

Driving under the influence of alcohol results in being held for 46 hours and a fine of up to 20,000 pesos if the driver scores 80 points or above on breathalyzer tests. 

From 60 to 79 points, the driver receives an infraction ticket, and another person has to drive the vehicle home.

“We are calling on all citizens to exercise moderation, as accidents of all sorts typically increase during the Christmas holidays,” said Carlos Lorenzo Montero Ávila of Mérida’s municipal police.

Other alcohol-induced accidents during the holidays include injuries caused by firework explosions, which can lead to serious injury and death. 

Some of the most popular types of pyrotechnics sold in Yucatán include hand-thrown explosives like petardos and palomas, known generically as “bombitas.” Photo: Carlos Rosado van der Gracht / Yucatán Magaine
Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Carlos Rosado van der Gracht
Born in Mérida, Carlos Rosado van der Gracht is a Mexican/Canadian blogger, photographer and adventure expedition leader. He holds degrees in multimedia, philosophy, and translation from universities in Mexico, Canada and Norway.
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