2 Mérida art venues reopen with a look at nature

Agnelly Chávez introduces her work in the gallery of the Peón Contreras. Photo: Courtesy
Agnelly Chávez introduces her work in the gallery of the Peón Contreras. Photo: Courtesy

The beauty of nature brings together the works of Agnelly Chávez, Ricardo Can and Kay Vilchis at the teatro José Peón Contreras and the Centro de Artes Visuales.

Their exhibits, which in English translate to “Honey Plant,” “Men and Animals of the Jungle” and “The World We Don’t See,” respectively, are on view until February. Visiting hours at both venues are from Wednesday to Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is free.

Chávez’s “Honey Plant” (in Mayan, Uxíiwi kaab) is made up of a dozen scientific illustrations in watercolor and colored pencil, on cotton paper. The plant in question is called the “trajonal,” which attracts honey bees in Yucatán.

Agnelly Chávez is a Visual Arts graduate from the Autonomous University of Yucatán and has been an artist for five years.

Added to the Peón Contreras exhibition, off the lobby on Calle 60 at 57, is a video with a poem in Mayan, dedicated to local culture and bees.

At the Centro de Artes Visual, on Calle 60 between 47 and 45, Kimbilá native Ricardo Can was inspired by climate change when he created “Men and Animals of the Jungle.”

He explained that he used natural indigo pigment, following the ancient Mayans, when choosing blue. Can, in the fourth year of his artistic career, exhorts the public to admire nature’s colors and the Mayan worldview.

Kay Vilchis presents more than two dozen underwater photographs presenting both the beauty and the pollution apparent in Yucatán’s cenotes.

Rosa Arteaga, head of the Department of Visual Arts at Sedeculta, stated that the artist’s objective is to raise awareness about these magical places.

In the exhibition there are also objects extracted from the cenotes, such as plastic wrappers and bottles.

Both venues reopened, after a long pause due to coronavirus restrictions, earlier this month.

Staff Writer

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